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Range Management Newsletter 15/1

March 2015 – Range Management Newsletter 15/1


FROM THE EDITOR

Noelene Duckett, 5 Amery Street, Ashburton VIC 3147. Email: aduckett7@msn.com

Welcome to the first Range Management Newsletter for 2015. There is a lot happening in the rangeland sphere at the moment - the ARS Biennial Conference and the ARS AGM in particular are nearly upon us. Whilst details of both of these events are included in this issue, I encourage you to read through all of the newsletter as there are some other important news articles. I’d like to highlight that the ARS is looking for a Social Media Editor to monitor the Society’s Twitter and Facebook accounts - if this sounds like you please further in this issue for details. Also, Council is considering moving to electronic publication only for the RMN (no printed copies) – see later for details. If you have an opinion about this (either for or against) please let me know at your earliest convenience either by email (aduckett7@msn.com - preferred) or by phone (03 9885 0926).

The major article included in this issue looks at population change in the Australian rangeland from 2001-2011 using Australian Collaborative Rangelands Information System (ACRIS) data, and is a follow-up from Gary Bastin and Vanessa Chewing’s article in the last newsletter which looked at non-pastoral production in the rangelands. Interestingly, this recent study has shown that, although the time period was relatively short, population changes (both gains and losses) have occurred. Follow up studies in the future would be interesting to see whether these trends continue or not, particularly given trends in the mining industry of late.

Finally, as there is a lot on, and to make sure that you don’t miss any important deadlines, I have put together a list of important dates coming up in the next few months. Don’t forget to put these in your calendar!

  • 25 March 2015 - Last day to register for the ARS 18th Biennial Conference
  • 31 March 2015 - Last day to renew your ARS Membership Subscription to continue to be financial for 2015 
  • 31 March 2015 - AW Howard Memorial Trust Grants and Award Applications due (further information is given later in this newsletter)
  • 10 April 2015 - Nominations for the ARS Council close (see John Taylor’s article on Vacancies on the ARS Council)
  • 12-16 April 2015 - ARS 18th Biennial Conference in Alice Springs, NT
  • 27 May 2015 - ARS Annual General Meeting (Notice of Meeting and Agenda details are later in this newsletter)
  • 19 June 2015 - Preferred final date for submission of articles for the July newsletter. Please consider sending in an article - I will definitely be looking for Biennial Conference reports!
  • 31 October 2015 – Deadline for submission of oral or poster presentations for IRC2016 (see IRC2016 update in this issue)

See you all next time. 

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

John Taylor, ARS President and Director, 37 Pioneer Crescent, Bellbowrie Qld 4070.
Email: taylamob@tpg.com.au

A conference in Canberra, in the depths of the winter of 1975, marked the establishment of the Australian Rangeland Society. Forty years on we will take the opportunity to celebrate this milestone in Alice Springs, and will reflect on the Society’s achievements through other initiatives throughout the year. There were sixty-five foundation members of the ARS, and at least ten of them will be in Alice Springs.

Over 200 people will be attending the Alice Springs conference, which starts in less than a month. It is a great program, focusing on ‘Innovation in the Rangelands’, with stimulating speakers and lots of opportunities for networking, learning, renewing friendships and seeing a wonderful part of Australia’s rangelands. If you haven’t already registered, do so NOW!

Over the past few months your Council has received updates on membership, finances and publications, considered applications for travel grants, completed contracts for the Society’s social media facilities and an upgrade of the ARS website, and has been preparing for the retirement of four members of Council in May.

There will be a joint Council and Publications Committee meeting, a General Meeting of the Society (Thursday 16 April) and a full meeting of Council whilst we are in Alice Springs. After that, our next major meeting will be the Annual General Meeting (AGM) on the 27th May. A notice of this meeting is provided elsewhere in this newsletter.

The Society for Range Management (SRM) held its 68th meeting in Sacramento, California in February. I participated in meetings of the International Affairs Committee and the Range Science Education Council, and met with the Board of the SRM. A report on the meeting is provided elsewhere in this newsletter.

Finally, I would like to congratulate Lauren Young (University of Sydney) on winning an ARS Travel Grant for research on plains mouse refuges in the NT, and Dr Vic Squires who was recognized by the international rangeland community with a SRM Honour Award. Vic’s citation is provided elsewhere in this newsletter.

I look forward to catching up with you in Alice Springs. In the meantime, safe travels. 

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ARS BIENNIAL CONFERENCE UPDATE

 

UPDATE FROM THE CONFERENCE ORGANISER

Ray Bird, Meeting Masters, PO Box 335, Leederville WA 6903. Email: enquiry@meetingmasters.com.au

With less than four weeks to go, over 200 delegates have registered for the Conference and registrations are continuing to arrive.
 
As there are several members away, we are pleased to advise that the registration date has been extended to Wednesday 25th March. 
 
Whilst all the mainland states/territories are represented we have also received registrations from South Africa, United Kingdom and Alaska. 
 
There has been a high level of interest in the Field Trips, with the Living off the Rangelands and Desert Waterhole tours now fully subscribed. There are still seats available for Trip B Tour to Hermannsburg, and for the ½ day Field Trip D, Innovative technologies. 
 
Having managed the Kununurra conference in 2012, we have a good understanding of the Society requirements. We are delighted with how the plans for Alice Springs are progressing and we are able to predict, with confidence, that the 18th Biennial Conference will be a great success. 
 
We look forward to seeing you all there. 

 

UPDATE FROM THE ORGANISING COMMITTEE

After calling for abstracts in early 2014, the Organising Committee received over 100 proposals for spoken presentations at this year’s Conference. These abstracts have been uploaded on to the ARS website (austrangesoc.com.au) for viewing – check under the What’s On tab on the web site for the direct link.

Based on these submissions, the Conference Program has been organised. Full details of each session are now available on the Conference website (arsconference.com.au).

Highlights of the program include:

Sunday 12 April 2015
Evening Civic Reception

Monday 13 April 2015
Pre-Conference Field Trips
Alice Springs Desert Park BBQ Dinner

Tuesday 14 April 2015

SESSION 1: Plenary Address - The Hon. Fred Chaney AO

SESSION 2: Leadership and relationships
Keynote Address: Dr Barry Traill - What’s in a name? Making Australians care about the Outback

SESSION 3: Pastoral management
Keynote Address: Dr Phil Holmes - An overview of rangeland pastoralism: has much changed and if not, what needs to change?

Wednesday 15 April 2015

SESSION 4: Water sharing
Rangeland Journal Lecture: Prof. Stuart Bunn - Challenges for sustainable water management in the rangelands

SESSION 5: Stories from the rangelands.

SESSION 6: Communication

SESSION 7: Adaptation and resilience

SESSION 8: Mining and Energy

Thursday 16 April 2015

Australian Rangeland Society General Meeting

SESSION 9: Natural Resource Management

SESSION 10: Policy directions
Keynote Address: Dr Bruce Walker - Radicalising the rangelands: disruptive change or progressive policy?

SESSION 11: Conference Summation and Close

Gala Conference Dinner

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NOTICE OF THE 2015 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE SOCIETY

The 2015 Annual General Meeting of the Australian Rangeland Society will be held on:

Wednesday 27th May 2015
at 5 pm (Qld time)
at 37 Pioneer Crescent, Bellbowrie, Queensland, 4070

Or join via teleconference - Dial 1800 173 224 and enter pin 715901#

The agenda will include:

1. Open Meeting
2. Apologies
3. Minutes of the 2014 Annual General Meeting
4. Receive the President’s report
5. Receive the Financial Reports
6. Elections for office bearers of the Society*
7. Motions on notice**
8. General business

The AGM will be followed by light refreshments.   Please let President John Taylor (07) 3202 7632 taylamob@tpg.com.au know if you will be attending in person.


*Elections for office bearers of the Society Section 16 of the Articles of Association of the Society provide for elections in each alternate year beginning in 1983 commencing at the end of the next Annual General Meeting. Positions are held for 4 years and Members of Council may not serve more than two four-year terms (eight consecutive years) on Council. The Officers of the Society are President, Finance and Audit Officer and Secretary. Up to five General Council Members complete the eight-member Council. Accordingly, nominations are called for three vacant positions for a term of four years as set out in the Articles.

The role descriptions and the key competencies and knowledge required for each of these positions is available later in this issue of the Range Management Newsletter.

The name of the present holder is shown along with an expression of their intention to nominate.

President                                   John Taylor – will retire (has completed two four-year terms)
                                                    David Phelps – continuing Member – will nominate as President

Secretary                                   Carolyn Ireland – continuing Member – will nominate as Secretary

Finance and Audit Officer       Peter Marin – will retire (has completed two four-year terms)

General Council Members     Annabel Walsh – will retire (has completed two four-year terms)
                                                    Graeme Tupper – will retire (has completed two four-year terms)
                                                    Ben Forsyth – will nominate as a General Council Member
                                                    Andrew Ash – will nominate as a General Council Member
                                                    Cathy Waters – will nominate as a General Council Member
                                                    Vacant Position
                                                    Vacant Position
                                                    Vacant Position

Other nominations for the vacant positions on Council are strongly encouraged. Any financial member of the ARS wishing to nominate for these positions must ensure their nomination form is lodged with the Secretary by 10 April 2015. Nomination forms are available from the ARS website 

NOTE: Nominations are particularly sought for the position of Officer of the Society/Finance and Audit Officer. In considering this position, please be aware that the Society currently has a Bookkeeper who maintains the day to day workings of the accounting system. The Finance and Audit Officer oversees the work of the Bookkeeper.


**Motions on notice are set out in this notice.
Any financial member wishing to place a motion on notice before the Annual General Meeting must ensure that the signed motion is lodged with the Secretary by 10 April 2015.

Motions should be emailed to:
Dr Carolyn Ireland, Secretary
The Australian Rangeland Society
cireland@irmpl.com.au


Motions on Notice

Motion 1
Solvency resolution

“That the Directors have reason to believe that the Australian Rangeland Society Ltd will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.”

Motion 2
Alterations to the Guidelines of the ARS Travel Grant and Scholarship

“That the Council of the Australian Rangeland Society (the Society) recommends that changes be made to the Guidelines of the Travel Grant and Scholarship to allow the following:

  • Restrict the amount given to each grantee to $2,000. As the total amount available for Travel Grants and Scholarships is $6,000 annually, this would allow three grants/scholarships to be awarded each year to Members of the Society who have been financial Members for at least 12 months at the time of their application.”

NOTE: Section 15 of the current Guidelines of the Travel Grant and Section 16 of the current Guidelines of the Scholarship state that the Guidelines may be altered by a majority vote at a special general meeting or an Annual General Meeting after notice has been duly served.

  • The proposed new wording in the Society Awards Guidelines is:

TRAVEL GRANTS
5. One or more Travel Grants (maximum of $2000 each) can be awarded in a calendar year. The maximum amount available for distribution in a calendar year is up to $6000 based on relevance, innovation and merit.
7. Successful applicants are required to submit an article reporting on their activities, suitable for publication in the Society’s Newsletter, within six months of completion of travel.

SCHOLARSHIPS
5. One or more Scholarships (maximum of $2000 each) can be awarded in a calendar year. The maximum amount available for distribution in a calendar year is up to $6000 based on relevance, innovation and merit. 

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VACANCIES ON THE ARS COUNCIL - John Taylor

John A Taylor, President and Director, On behalf of the ARS Council

From time to time positions on the ARS Council become available through the completion of fixed terms or resignations. In May 2015, four positions on the ARS Council will become available with the retirement of two Directors of the Society (i.e. President and Finance & Audit Officer) and two General Members of Council, one of whom is currently the Subscriptions Manager.

To ensure a smooth transition at the May 2015 AGM, Council is now seeking Expressions of Interest from financial Members who are willing to contribute significantly to the Society’s primary objectives, viz:

  • to promote the advancement of the science and art of using Australia's rangeland resources for all purposes commensurate with their continued productivity and stability;
  • to encourage and develop an awareness of the need to conserve the inherent resources of Australia's rangeland areas;
  • to encourage and reward the study of rangeland science and improved rangeland management;
  • to provide a means for the interchange of ideas and information amongst Society members and with those of allied disciplines concerned with rangelands;
  • to hold periodical meetings of Society members in different parts of Australia;
  • to publish a journal for distribution among Society members and other interested persons and bodies.

Council believes that a mix of experience and youth from among the RD&E professionals, practical land managers and others working in the rangelands will be important for the leadership necessary for the Society to continue to meet its objectives over the next 5-10 years.

Ideally, prospective members of Council would have experience of Australia’s rangelands and a willingness to commit to bi-monthly Council meetings, usually held by teleconference, and respond to occasional out-of-session correspondence. The Council also meets face-to-face as part of the Society’s Biennial Conference. Appointments to these Council positions would normally be for a 4-year term, with possible extension to a maximum of eight years.

The duties and expectations of the various positions on Council are provided following.  The Nomination form can be found here - nominations should be supported by financial members of the Society.

Members interested in any of these positions should submit an expression of interest that specifies the preferred role, addresses the key competencies and knowledge required for that role, and includes a current CV to the Secretary of the ARS, Carolyn Ireland (cireland@irmpl.com.au) by Friday 10th April 2015.

Please note that all members of Council are willing to discuss their roles with prospective new Councillors. The contact details of the incumbents are listed on the inside cover of the RMN.

We look forward to your expressions of interest.
 

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ARS COUNCIL ROLE STATEMENTS

The management and control of the business and the affairs of the Australian Rangeland Society are vested in the Council. Council comprises the Officers of the Society, namely the President, the Finance and Audit Officer, the Secretary, and up to five General Council Members. The President, the Secretary and the Finance and Audit Officer are the designated Directors of the Society. The maximum term for an officer of the Society is four years. However, members can re-nominate for one further four-year term.


President and Director

General

Provide leadership and ensure that Council fulfils its governance responsibilities in managing the business effectively to meet the objectives of the Society as defined in the Articles and Memorandum of Association.

It is estimated that the time spent on Council matters is approximately 2-3 hours/week, with perhaps a day’s intensive activity in the week before and after Council meetings. No fee or remuneration is paid by the Society for the performance of this role.

Duties

  • Ensure good governance of Council and the ARS. Fulfil the responsibilities of a Director and ensure that ASIC and ATO obligations are met.
  • Provide operational leadership in matters relating to the ARS.
  • Convene and Chair bi-monthly Council teleconferences, biennial face-to-face Council meetings and joint meetings of the Council and Sub-committees such as the Publications Committee.
  • Participate in Conference Organizing Committee(s) to provide a direct link to Council.
  • In collaboration with the Secretary, prepare meeting agendas.
  • Identify issues and risks, and provide strategic direction regarding the Society’s future.
  • Induct new Councillors and provide support for other Councillors in matters relating to the ARS.
  • Report regularly to Members through the Range Management Newsletter.
  • Oversee the development of, and act as the Signing Officer for, the annual Directors Report, and chair the AGM in May.
  • Promote the ARS, act as the leader and spokesperson for the Society, and where appropriate represent the ARS in public.
  • Liaise with ARS partners and other relevant bodies to progress the science and art of using Australia’s rangeland resources for all purposes commensurate with their continued productivity and stability.

Key Competencies and Knowledge

  • Capacity to commit time to the above duties, attend and participate actively in bi-monthly Council meetings, and to progress ARS business out-of-session by responding promptly to requests from Council for information or action.
  • Training and experience in ‘best practice’ corporate governance for the NfP sector, and understanding of the responsibilities of a Director under ASIC.
  • Proven ability to communicate effectively in writing and verbally; and strong inter-personal skills.
  • Considerable experience and networks in the rangelands.
  • Ability to work as part of an effective team and contribute to team effectiveness.
  • Advanced user of Microsoft Office applications such as Excel, Word, Powerpoint and Outlook.


Secretary and Director

General

The Secretary shall attend or be represented at all meetings of the Society and of the Council. He/she shall prepare minutes of all such meetings for presentation to the next subsequent meeting, and under the direction of the Council, shall conduct the correspondence of the Society.
It is estimated that the time spent on Council matters is approximately 2-3 hours/week. However, during the week of a bi-monthly Council Meeting the time spent would be about 1-2 days depending on the meeting. No fee or remuneration is paid by the Society for the performance of this role.

Duties

  • Fulfil the responsibilities of a Director and ensure that ASIC and ATO obligations are met. Ensure good governance of Council and the ARS.
  • Attend and participate actively in bi-monthly Council teleconferences and biennial face-to-face meetings.
  • Prepare the Agenda for meetings. (Email Council members beforehand to ask for any items to be included.)
  • Take the Minutes at the meetings, compile an action list and circulate both to Councillors within 5 days of a meeting.
  • Undertake any follow-up activities post Council meetings.
  • Maintain a Minute register, policy manual and relevant files.
  • Support all Councillors in their role(s), act as liaison between individual Council members, sub-committees and Council as a whole.
  • Act as the 'front line' person for correspondence (email, phone, mail) between the public, ARS members and Council. Forward correspondence to the relevant person for action. Maintain a Correspondence Register and report items at Council meetings.
  • As a Director, approve expenditure and signatory on the Society’s bank accounts.

Key competencies and Knowledge

  • Capacity to commit time to fulfil the above duties, attend and participate actively in Council meetings, and to progress ARS business out-of-session by responding promptly to requests from Council for information or action.
  • Training and experience in ‘best practice’ corporate governance for the NfP sector, and understanding of the responsibilities of a Director under ASIC.
  • Proven ability to communicate effectively in writing and verbally; and strong interpersonal skills.
  • Considerable experience and networks in the rangelands.
  • Ability to work as part of an effective team and contribute to team effectiveness.
  • Advanced user of Microsoft Office applications such as Excel, Word, Powerpoint and Outlook.


Finance and Audit Officer and Director

General

The Finance and Audit Officer shall receive and pay into the Society's bank account all monies received by him/her on account of the Society and pay all accounts approved by the Council, and shall prepare or cause to be prepared annual accounts for submission to the Council and the annual general meeting of the Society.
It is estimated that the time spent on Council matters is approximately 2 hours/week. No fee or remuneration is paid by the Society for the performance of this role.

Duties

  • Fulfil the responsibilities of a Director and ensure that ASIC and ATO obligations are met. Ensure good governance of Council and the ARS.
  • Attend and participate actively in bi-monthly Council teleconferences and biennial face-to-face meetings.
  • Overview the financial position, book-keeping practices and audit processes of the ARS.
  • Supervise and liaise with the Bookkeeper of the Society.
  • Report the Society’s financial position in writing to Council bi-monthly and annually to members.
  • Manage the ARS’s finances by:
    1. Receiving, receipting and depositing funds paid directly to the Society.
    2. Disbursing the funds of the Society in accordance with the purposes of the Society, and keeping adequate and appropriate records of such disbursements.
    3. Paying all accounts forwarded to the Society.
    4. Keeping all receipts, payment information, bank statements etc. in a central filing system, and for the time required by ASIC, ATO, etc.
    5. Preparing and submitting quarterly BAS reporting including making payments if required.
    6. Maintaining the Society bank accounts and monthly balances, and reporting balances to Council at its bi-monthly meetings and to members annually.
    7. Approving expenditure and being a signatory on the Society’s bank accounts.
    8. Oversee the transfer and management of funds between the Society bank accounts, including the operational, conference and savings account.
  • Work with the Society's biennial Conference Committees to transfer seed funds and ensure appropriate preparation and management of budget and operational spending. This also includes changing signatories of conference bank account.
  • Oversighting the annual Audit process and providing financial statements to ASIC and the ATO as required by legislation. This includes working with the auditor and other Council members to prepare sections of the audit report.
  • Convene and Chair the Finance and Audit Committee (as required).

Key competencies and Knowledge

  • Qualifications and/or experience in ‘best practice’ financial management and accounting practices, including budgeting, book-keeping and reporting.
  • In-depth understanding of the financial responsibilities of a Not-for-Profit organization under ASIC, ATO and relevant legislation.
  • Capacity to commit time to fulfil the above duties, attend and participate actively in Council meetings, and to progress ARS business out-of-session by responding promptly to requests from Council for information or action.
  • Training and experience in ‘best practice’ corporate governance for the NfP sector, and understanding of the responsibilities of a Director under ASIC.
  • Proven ability to communicate effectively in writing and verbally.
  • Experience and networks in the rangelands.
  • Ability to work as part of an effective team and contribute to team effectiveness.
  • Ability to work closely with the book keeper of the Society.
  • Advanced user of Microsoft Office applications such as Excel, Word and Outlook.


Subscription Manager

(NOTE: This position is not necessarily a Council position, but that is valuable.)

General

The Subscription Manager shall be responsible for a Register of Members that shall contain such particulars as the Council shall, from time to time prescribe. He/she shall be responsible for a Register of Subscribers to the Society's publications.

It is estimated that the time spent on Council matters is approximately 10 hours/week in the early part of the membership/calendar year. Thereafter, it is around 5 hours/week. A small remuneration is paid for the performance of this role.

Duties

  • Overview ARS membership trends and issues by maintaining a membership database.
  • Identify and lead initiatives to attract and retain members.
  • Report on membership issues to Council bi-monthly and annually to members.

Where the Subscription Manager is also a member of Council, his/her duties would include:

  • Attend and participate actively in bi-monthly Council teleconferences and biennial face-to-face meetings.

a) Membership Subscription and Database Management

  • Maintain the membership databases as required.
  • Review and maintain Rangeland Management Newsletter database.
  • Membership Renewal Notice – From 1st January each year, prepare and send out renewal notices electronically.
  • Process membership renewals. Send at least two reminder Renewal Notices to members as the 31 March deadline approaches.
  • Membership reports – Prepare a brief report for each Council meeting, and a major report for the AGM.
  • Membership Queries – Respond to all membership queries.
  • Maintain historical membership paper records.
  • Maintain mailing lists for the publication of The Rangeland Journal - Provide CSIRO Publishing with up to date lists, and new member email addresses.

b) Printing and posting of Range Management Newsletter

  • Liaise with the RMN Editor on RMN printing schedules, and proof-read the final draft.
  • Liaise with a local printing firm about all aspects of the printing of the RMN.
  • Maintain mailing lists.
  • Prepare and print mailing labels and post to the members who require a printed copy. In addition, as required, post back copies of TRJ and RMN to new members.


Key competencies and Knowledge

  • Capacity to commit time to fulfil the above duties, attend and participate actively in Council meetings, and to progress ARS business out-of-session by responding promptly to requests from Council for information or action.
  • Understanding of corporate governance expectations and standards in the NfP sector.
  • Proven ability to communicate effectively in writing and verbally, and strong interpersonal skills.
  • Experience and networks in the rangelands.
  • Ability to work as part of an effective team and contribute to team effectiveness.
  • Advanced user of Microsoft Office applications such as Access, Excel, Word and Outlook.

 

General Member

General

General Members of Council are expected to contribute actively to meeting the objectives of the Society.

It is estimated that the time spent on Council matters is approximately 2-3 hours/week and 4-6 hours prior and post the bi-monthly teleconferences. Additional time may be required for sub-committee and other tasks as the need arises. No fee or remuneration is paid by the Society for the performance of this role.

Duties

  • Attend and actively contribute to the business of regular Council teleconferences and biennial face-to-face meetings.
  • Promote the ARS and rangeland science and management.
  • Work with the Subscriptions Manager to attract new members.
  • Identify and raise current and emerging issues relating to the science and art of using Australia’s rangelands for all purposes commensurate with their continued productivity and stability.
  • Chair subcommittees of the Council and report back with decisions.
  • Step up into more senior roles if and as required by the Directors.

Key competencies and Knowledge

  • Capacity to commit time to attend and participate actively in Council meetings, and to progress ARS business out-of-session by responding promptly to requests from Council for information or action.
  • Proven ability to communicate effectively in writing and verbally.
  • Experience and networks in the rangelands.
  • Understanding of corporate governance expectations and standards in the NfP sector.
  • Ability to work as part of an effective team.
  • Competent user of Microsoft Office applications such as Excel, Word and Outlook. 

 

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ARS SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR - CALL FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

The Australian Rangeland Society is seeking expressions of interest from members willing to act as the Society’s Social Media Editor, with responsibility for moderating the Society's social media accounts (including at least Facebook and Twitter).

This position is expected to become available in the latter half of 2015. A detailed statement of responsibilities will be available at that time. The position is voluntary but will attract an honorarium of $2500 per annum.

Please feel free to share this opportunity with colleagues who may be interested.

For further information contact Dr Ron Hacker, Chair Publications Committee, Tel 02 4934 8383 / 0419 488 318 or Email: ron.hacker@crt.net.au 

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MOVE TO ELECTRONIC PUBLICATION FOR THE RMN

The Council of the Society is considering a move to fully electronic publication of the Range Management Newsletter in 2016, that is phasing out hard copy issues distributed by post. This is in line with moves by the publishers of other newsletters similar to RMN and is aimed at keeping costs down while providing members with ready access to the RMN via the web site.

Before implementing this decision, Council would welcome members’ feedback on the acceptability of the proposal. If there are strong reasons for retaining a hard copy version Council would be prepared to reconsider its position although this may also entail a review of annual subscriptions for members wishing to continue receiving hard copy.

If you wish to express an opinion for or against a move to fully electronic publication of the RMN, or explain why removal of the hard copy option would be a disadvantage for you, please do so to the Editor, Noelene Duckett - aduckett7@msn.com

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POPULATION CHANGE IN THE AUSTRALIAN RANGELANDS

Gary Bastin and Vanessa Chewings, formerly CSIRO, Alice Springs
Gary’s contact details: PO Box 2886, Alice Springs NT 0871. Email: gary-bastin@bigpond.com


Introduction
In the previous issue of the Range Management Newsletter (RMN 14/3), we presented statistics on the area, production and value of non-pastoral agricultural production in the rangelands based on the 2011 agricultural census conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). Here, we provide a companion description of some characteristics of population change from the 2001, 2006 and 2011 censuses of Population and Housing conducted by the same agency.

As described in the RMN 14/3 article, the Australian Collaborative Rangelands Information System (ACRIS) operated between 2003 and mid 2014. During that time it sought to provide timely information about components of biophysical, economic and social change in the rangelands (see map, Figure 1). To the extent possible, ACRIS used the Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia (IBRA v7) as its preferred spatial stratification for reporting. Further information about ACRIS, including reports, is available at:
www.environment.gov.au/topics/land/rangelands/australian-collaborative-rangelands-information-system-acris (accessed 22 September 2014).

 

Figure 1. Extent of the rangelands and bioregion boundaries (IBRA v7).

 

Population data
The ABS uses Statistical Local Areas (SLAs) as its base spatial unit to disseminate socio-economic statistics. For consistency, we used the Time Series Profile data released by the ABS. Data are only available as “place of enumeration” from this profile. Place of enumeration is the place at which the person is counted, i.e. where he/she spent Census Night, which may not be where that person usually lives (further information in the ABS Census Dictionary accessed 23 September 2014 at: http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/2901.0).

Each SLA is sufficiently large in area to maintain anonymity of data collected from individual households during censuses. Thus SLAs are smaller in area in cities and larger in sparsely populated regions (Figure 2). There were 245 SLAs wholly or partly in the rangelands at the 2011 census, 100 of these bordering the rangelands.

We used area-weighted concordance to proportionally adjust the population data from individual SLAs to their component rangeland IBRAs (see Bastin and Chewings 2014 for description of method and illustrated example). The process was applied to data from each of the 2001, 2006 and 2011 censuses.

Varying population density between urban and rural / remote regions means that concordance can only approximate the population for each bioregion. For SLAs that are entirely in the rangelands, the summed SLA- and IBRA-level populations should be reasonably similar. However, the error associated with concordance may increase for SLAs that straddle the rangelands boundary. Where most of the population for such an SLA is located in a larger town beyond the rangelands boundary, the rangelands component of the population will be over-estimated (Figure 2). Conversely, the rangelands population will be under-estimated where larger towns or communities occur within the rangelands.

We adopted a pragmatic view to this source of error in estimating population and its change in the rangelands. The method was applied consistently to the data from the three censuses. Errors associated with correctly estimating the rangelands component of population in SLAs intersecting the rangelands boundary were considered small compared to the contribution to total population of larger urban centres within the rangelands and probable mobility of at least some of this population.

Rangeland population and change
There were approximately 815,000 people in the rangelands at the time of the 2011 census (Table 1). This was an increase of 11.4% on the number present in 2001 and a 10.7% increase since 2006.

 

Table 1. Recent population trends in the rangelands since 2001.

Population component

2001

2006

2011

% Change since 2006

Total

731,730

736,533

815,107

10.7

Indigenous

119,613

122,849

133,490

8.7

Farmers

not calculated

18,507

16,519

-10.7

 

 

Figure 2. A regional example of likely errors in concording population data from SLAs in southern NSW to rangeland IBRAs and, in turn, the rangelands as a whole. Condobolin, the major town in the Lachlan (A) SLA, is just outside the rangelands. Area based concordance will over-estimate the rangelands component of this SLA’s population in the Cobar Peneplain IBRA. Narrandera is similarly located outside the rangelands in the Narrandera (A) SLA and the population for the rangelands component of the Riverina IBRA is likely over-estimated using area-weighted concordance. Conversely, Jerilderie and Moulamein are just inside the rangelands boundary (Jerilderie (A) and Wakool (A) SLAs respectively) and the proportional representation of their population data to the rangelands component of the Riverina IBRA may slightly under-estimate the total rangeland population.


There was a slightly lesser rate of increase in people who identified as indigenous while the number of “farmers” (people directly involved in agricultural production – grazing, cropping or horticulture) fell between 2006 and 2011.

There were spatial differences, at bioregion scale, in the 2011 population and its percentage change since 2006 (Figures 3 and 4). The ten most populous rangeland bioregions were:

IBRA                                                  2011 Population         %Change since 2006

Darwin Coastal                                    127,868                                  10.2

Pilbara                                                     61,627                                   54.0

Gawler                                                     42,028                                     5.0

Coolgardie                                              40,418                                     8.8

Riverina (NSW)                                      35,021                                    -3.1

Brigalow Belt North                               34,857                                   16.0

Darling Riverine Plains (NSW)           34,354                                    -2.1

Einasleigh Uplands                              28,413                                      6.9

MacDonnell Ranges                             27,873                                     5.8

Gulf Plains (Qld)                                     21,703                                   11.2

 

 

Figure 3. Rangeland population by IBRA recorded at the 2011 census.


The population of most WA rangeland bioregions increased between 2006 and 2011, several by greater than 25% (Figure 4). Much of this increase was probably driven by continued expansion of the mining and exploration sectors. Much of northern Australia, the Simpson Desert region and the Desert Uplands – Brigalow Belt North areas also experienced population growth, again probably largely associated with mining. These large relative increases should be interpreted against an often low population base (Figure 3).

 

Figure 4. Percentage change in population of rangeland bioregions between the 2006 and 2011 censuses.


Conversely, population declined throughout the NSW rangelands, the Riverland and Stony Plains in South Australia, and the Arnhem Coast and central parts of the Northern Territory.

Greater than half the population in 2011 was indigenous in most NT bioregions; the Great Victoria Desert, Central Ranges and Finke IBRAs in SA; Central Ranges and Tanami in WA; and Cape York Peninsula in Queensland (Figure 5). The indigenous population comprised >20% of total population elsewhere in the NT apart from the Darwin Coastal, Pine Creek and MacDonnell Ranges IBRAs. This was also the case for northern and desert IBRAs in WA (Ord Victoria Plain; Victoria Bonaparte; Dampierland; Central and Northern Kimberley; Gibson, Great Sandy and Great Victoria Deserts). A further six IBRAs with >20% indigenous population were spread throughout the rest of the rangelands (Hampton and Nullarbor in SA, Gulf Plains in Queensland and Mulga Lands, Darling Riverine Plain and Brigalow Belt South in NSW).

 

 

Figure 5. Indigenous people as a percentage of total bioregional population recorded at the 2011 census.


Derived characteristics of the rangeland population
The ABS generates a number of indices from their population census data. In a recent Range Management Newsletter article, we illustrated bioregional trend in the age dependency ratio from 2001 to 2011 (Ludwig et al. 2014). This ratio describes the proportion of “dependent” people in the population (those aged 64), and assumes that age determines a person’s ability to participate in the workforce. Ratio values consistently decreased in most WA bioregions (i.e. over time, more people in the population group aged 15 to 64). Some traditional pastoral bioregions had an ageing population, further supported by a related indicator showing an increasing median age of farmers in most rural communities. This, combined with youth migration to cities, may have largely explained the positive slope for age dependency ratio (i.e. increase in the “dependent” component of the population) in rangeland bioregions where pastoralism predominates (see Figure 3 in Ludwig et al. 2014).

Median age
The median age of IBRA-level population was older in the south eastern rangelands compared with the Northern Territory, much of WA and the Central Ranges, Finke and Great Victoria Desert bioregions in SA (Fig. 6). The Carnarvon, Yalgoo, Nullarbor and Great Victoria Desert IBRAs were exceptions to this pattern in WA (i.e. these bioregions having an older median age). In north-central Queensland, the Gulf Plains, Einasleigh Uplands and Desert Uplands had an older median age than the surrounding Cape York Peninsula, Mount Isa Inlier, Mitchell Grass Downs and Brigalow Belt North IBRAs.

 

Figure 6. Median age of people in rangeland bioregions from the 2011 census.


For much of the NT, SA, NSW and parts of Queensland and WA, there appeared to be an inverse relationship between the indigenous composition of bioregional population (Figure 5) and median age of the whole population (Figure 6), IBRA values graphed in Figure 7. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the two datasets is -0.825 (P<0.01, n=69 IBRAs; i.e. excluding state-level bioregions with

Unemployment
Highest unemployment rates (>7.5%) in 2011 were recorded in several NT bioregions, Cape York Peninsula and the NSW parts of the Broken Hill Complex and Brigalow Belt South (Figure 8, top map). Lowest rates (<2.5%) were present in dispersed IBRAs:
• The Gascoyne, Pilbara and Great Victoria Desert in WA
• Desert Uplands and Channel Country in Queensland
• Simpson Strzelecki Dunefields in South Australia.

Higher rates of unemployment at IBRA scale tended to align with a higher proportion of indigenous population (Figure 5) while, to some extent, lower unemployment appeared to be associated with high levels of mining activity.

Figure 7. Relationship between the percentage of indigenous people in each rangeland bioregion at the 2011 census and the median age of the whole IBRA-level population. Numbers identify bioregions (separated a “/” where multiple bioregions plot in the same location). See Table 2 for the identity of bioregions. The dashed line shows the least-squares linear fit to the data.

Table 2. Identity of rangeland bioregions as numbered in Figure 7.

 

The level of unemployment increased across most of northern Australia between the censuses of 2006 and 2011 (Figure 8, bottom map). It also increased in some desert bioregions of WA, SA and the NT. Unemployment remained fairly static in the central and southern parts of the Queensland rangelands, in the Murchison, Yalgoo, Carnarvon and Great Sandy Desert IBRAs in WA, and in the Riverina and Murray Darling Depression bioregions in NSW. Employment rates decreased elsewhere in the NSW rangelands, in most of the SA pastoral bioregions (apart from the Murray Darling Depression), in the Pilbara, Gascoyne and Nullarbor IBRAs in WA and in the Barkly region of the NT (Mitchell Grass Downs and Davenport Murchison Ranges).

 

Figure 8. Top: percentage unemployment by rangeland bioregion recorded at the 2011 census. Bottom: bioregional change in unemployment rate between the 2006 and 2011 censuses.


Concluding comments
This brief report gives some insight to the population profiles of jurisdictional-level bioregions in the rangelands and how these profiles have changed with the census data collected in recent years. We have not attempted to report for the full set of socio-economic indicators compiled, at SLA resolution, for earlier ACRIS reporting. Those seeking further information should refer to Rangelands 2008 – Taking the pulse (Bastin and ACRIS Management Committee 2008) for older information about population characteristics in the rangelands.

This commentary describes aspects of the population and its recent change within that part of Australia broadly defined by the ACRIS Management Committee as the rangelands. There are some large urban centres within the rangelands, most notably, Darwin and Palmerston. Additionally, there is substantial mining activity, e.g. the Pilbara and Goldfields regions in WA and Roxby Downs in SA. Much of the population in these areas has little to do with the more recognised and extensive rangeland uses of pastoralism, conservation, tourism and Aboriginal customary use. However, a variable component of the population in most urban centres does provide an important service industry to these latter land uses, plus exploration and mining. The importance of such service, and tertiary industry more generally, in rangeland towns is further expanded by the provision of health, education, infrastructure, financial and welfare services, among others, to remote businesses and communities. Thus it is impractical to identify that section of the rangeland population directly involved in, or associated with, production and natural resource management related to conventional or traditional rangeland use. Rather, we have taken the more pragmatic view of reporting dynamics for the whole population in that area of Australia that is broadly defined as the rangelands – but certainly do not claim that all of this population is intrinsically connected to the rangelands.

Across the rangelands as a whole:

  • Its population grew by almost 11% between 2001 and 2011. There were large regional differences in population change (Figure 4); most notably, substantial growth in much of the WA rangelands and decline in most of the NSW rangelands and remote parts of the central NT.
  • The number directly involved in agricultural production (grazing, cropping or horticulture, i.e. farmers) declined by almost 11% in the five years to 2011.
  • Approximately 16% of the population identified as indigenous at the 2011 census. As for total population, there were large regional differences (Figure 5).
  • Northern Australia, and particularly the NT, has a generally younger population (Figure 6). At IBRA scale in 2011, there was a strong inverse relationship between median age of the whole population and its indigenous component (Figure 7).
  • In 2011, there was higher unemployment in the more remote parts of the NT and in far northern Queensland, particularly Cape York Peninsula. Unemployment increased across much of northern Australia and other remote desert regions between 2006 and 2011 (Figure 8).


Although not explicitly identified or tested for in this analysis, it was probable that the mining boom was an important driver of population change in parts of the rangelands, particularly much of WA, prior to the 2011 census. Various statistical data, including declining mineral prices, now support the view that this boom has slowed or ended. Meanwhile, there are continuing initiatives to improve the health, education and employment prospects for indigenous people across much of the rangelands and thereby decrease their dependence on welfare. Opportunities for northern Australian development, including the prospect of major government initiatives, are also building. With or without a re-activated ACRIS, it should be possible to conduct similar analyses of population data following the 2016 census and continue to track components of population change in the rangelands.

Acknowledgements
We thank Ian Watson for encouraging this work within ACRIS and for his constructive comments on an earlier version of this article. Comments and advice from Yiheyis Maru then led to this improved version. The Australian Government provided funding for ACRIS while it operated. Ninti One Ltd administered this funding.

References
Bastin, G., and ACRIS Management Committee (2008). Rangelands 2008—Taking the pulse. Published on behalf of the Australian Collaborative Rangeland Information System (ACRIS), Australian Government, Canberra, ACT. Available at:
http://www.environment.gov.au/topics/land/rangelands/australian-collaborative-rangelands-information-system-acris.

Bastin, G. And Chewings, V. (2014). Non-pastoral agricultural production and value in the rangelands. Range Management Newsletter No. 14/3, 11-22.

Ludwig, John A., Bastin, Gary N., Davies, Jocelyn and Eyre, Teresa J. (2014). Monitoring rangelands: a more integrated approach using biophysical and socio-economic indicators. Range Management Newsletter No. 14/2, 5-11.

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WATER POINTS AS A KEY THREATENING PROCESS UNDER THE EPBC ACT

John Taylor, ARS President and Director. Email: taylamob@tpg.com.au

In 2014, under the provisions of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act), the Threatened Species Scientific Committee sought comment on - ‘biodiversity decline and habitat degradation in the arid and semi-arid rangelands due to the proliferation, placement and management of artificial watering points’.

Several members of the Australian Rangeland Society responded and provided comment on the proposed nomination of artificial water points as a key threatening process.

It was recently announced that the Australian Government Minister for the Environment, the Hon Greg Hunt MP, has decided not to list this process as a key threatening process under the EPBC Act.   In doing so, the Minister had regard to the advice provided by the Committee in relation to the eligibility of this process for listing under the EPBC Act and to the comments received from the consultation process.  The Committee’s listing advice for this assessment is available on the Department’s website at:
http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/nominations/ineligible-key-threatening-processes. This is a very comprehensive review of the topic, and is worth reading.

Information about key threatening processes, and the process of assessing these for listing, is available at: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/key-threatening-processes. A listing of acknowledged key threatening processes can be found at: http://www.environment.gov.au/cgibin/sprat/public/publicgetkeythreats.pl.

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HOWARD MEMORIAL TRUST GRANTS AND AWARDS

The AW Howard Memorial Trust Incorporated is pleased to announce its 2015 AW Howard Memorial Trust Study Awards, Grants In-aid and Extension Study Awards.

The AW Howard Memorial Trust Study Awards are awarded annually on a competitive basis to allow participation in national or international conferences and/or to undertake study tours. Applicants must have tertiary qualifications and/or relevant experience; the study award provides up to $5000 to the successful applicant/s to provide a career development opportunity.

The Trust also takes pleasure in announcing their Grants In-aid. The grants in-aid are awarded to Australian organisations, associations, communities or persons that seek financial aid for projects designed to either: commemorate significant contributions made to pastoral sciences or pastoral industries at National, State or Regional scales; facilitate effective dissemination and publication of innovative science and extension relevant to the development, management and use of pastures within Australia or within Australian regions; invite an eminent overseas pasture scientist to visit Australia to deliver a keynote address at an Australian, International or Regional conference and/ or to visit major regional centres to interact with scientists and community groups involved in pastoral industries; or contribute towards the purchase of essential equipment required for research and development projects in the field of pastoral sciences. Up to $5,000 may be awarded.

Every two years, the Trust awards a Specialist Study Award for Austral ian Pastoral Industry Extension Specialists, Consultants and Agribusiness Staff. This award is aimed at study tours either in Austral ia or overseas to examine grazing systems and practices that are perceived to have economic, social and environmental benefits to Australian pastoral industries and rural communities. It is aimed at promoting producer and adviser excellence and leadership. Up to $20,000 may be provided to the successful applicant.

Applications for the grants close 31 March 2015.

For further information about the grants please check the website contact the Trust on 08 8303 9401 or email chloe.mcewen@sa.gov.au.
 

 

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2016 IRC SECOND ANNOUNCEMENT

Bruce Coulman and Duane McCartney , IRC 2016 Co-Chairs

You are invited to attend

the Xth International Rangeland Congress in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada July 17-22, 2016

The Future Management of Grazing and Wild Lands in a High Tech World


CALL FOR PAPERS

We invite you to present a paper - oral or poster presentation - featuring your research on range/grassland related to one of the topics listed below.

If you are a rancher, grass farmer, extension agrostologist, range manager, land reclamation specialist, parks or wild lands supervisor, modeller, remote sensing specialist or a person interested in the management of the world’s grazing and wild lands you are also invited to make an oral or poster presentation involving your work or operation.

Below is a list of the topic categories that you can present in.

1.0 STATE OF GLOBAL & CANADIAN RANGELAND AND PASTURE RESOURCES
Eco site descriptions, Historical developments, Conservation, Grazing management, Genetic resources and forage development.

2.0 ECOLOGICAL GOODS & SERVICES OF RANGELANDS & PASTURELANDS
Nutritional links from soil to plant to livestock to people, Carbon sequestration, Water supply and quality, Wildlife habitat , Aesthetic and spiritual value of wild lands.

3.0 THE PEOPLE OF THE GRASSLANDS
Changes to pastoral systems, Private and leased, Urban and sub-urban grassland societies, Professional extension and technology-transfer, Social justice issues in rangelands.

4.0 MULTIPLE USE OF RANGELANDS – RESOURCE EXTRACTION IMPACTS IN ASIA AND NORTH AMERICA
Energy development and reclamation, Fire management and restoration, Re-vegetation with perennial forages, Invasive species impacts, Wild land conflicts in tourism.

5.0 RANGE AND FORAGE OF HIGH LATITUDES & ALTITUDES INCLUDING ARCTIC AND SUBARCTIC NORTH AMERICA & EUROPE, ANDEAN/PATAGONIAN OR TIBETAN PLATEAU

6.0 CLIMATE CHANGE IN RANGELAND
Climate change impact on Plant, Livestock and grazing system, Water supply and quality, Historic & cultural response, Modeling future human and climate change response.

7.0 GRAZING LAND ASSESSMENT & MANAGEMENT IN A HIGH-TECH WORLD
New Technology in: Remote sensing for land resource data acquisition and modeling, Social and psychological data, Animal movement data, Education and extension, new developments in fencing, water supply, and livestock health.

 

RANCHER/STOCKMAN/CATTLEMEN/HERDSMEN FORUM
Management of grazing lands has changed over time as knowledge of grassland systems increase and new challenges, opportunities, innovations, and technologies emerge. This Forum will include presentations from ranchers and grassland farmers on the Canadian prairies as well as from ranchers, stockmen, and grass farmers in other regions of the world.

TOURS
There will be two 4 day pre-congress tours in Saskatchewan visiting rangeland projects, ranches and farms. The 7 day pre-congress tour will visit the rangelands and ranches of southern Saskatchewan and Alberta in Western Canada including the Rocky Mountains. In addition, several local full day tours, mid-week (Wednesday) during the Congress will visit research facilities, farms, cattle ranches, historical and cultural sites. There will also be programs for accompanying persons.


For more information, and if you would like to continue to receive email updates about IRC 2016, please go to our website: www.irc2016canada.ca and sign up.

We hope to see you in Saskatoon in July 2016! 

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68TH SOCIETY FOR RANGE MANAGEMENT MEETING, FEBRUARY 2015

John Taylor, ARS President and Director. Email: taylamob@tpg.com.au

This very successful meeting was held in Sacramento, California and was attended by almost 1400 people; a third of them students – high school, undergraduate and graduate students.

The theme of the meeting was ‘Managing Diversity’, with over 300 papers and 140 posters presented over 7 days in 6 workshops, 15 technical sessions and 20 symposia.
The Program is available at http://rangelands.org/sacramento2015/2015-SRM-program.pdf  and abstracts of the presentations are available at  http://www.rangelands.org/sacramento2015/2015-SRM-proceedings.pdf  (Accessed 03/03/15).

The Program began with one of the most stimulating and entertaining plenary sessions I have ever experienced - a presentation by Temple Grandin (Colorado State) on ‘Different and diverse minds will be more effective in solving problems’.   Dr Grandin gave some wonderful examples of three different types of thinking (i.e. photo realistic, pattern and auditory thinking) and how an understanding of these can help people work together more effectively and improve problem solving for more innovative research, development and extension.

The workshops were held on topics such as: ‘Why should you communicate your research in popular venues’ and ‘Ranching sustainability - self-analysis and assessment’. Technical sessions included social science, rangeland ecology, remote sensing, vegetation management and restoration, invasive species monitoring and management, grazing ecology and management, fire ecology and management, and inventory, monitoring and assessment. Symposia included ‘Collaborative landscape management’, ‘Monitoring for adaptive management’, ‘Integrating ecological and socio-economic factors into restoration decision making and outcomes’, ‘Collaborative conservation’, ‘Non-lethal strategies for minimizing livestock predation’ and ‘Rangelands and energy development’. For the first time I can recall there were two symposia with an education focus – ‘K-12 Education’ and ‘Building a better capstone for multidisciplinary education’. Two intriguing symposium topics – ‘Useable science’ and ‘Confronting the management-science knowledge gap to support natural resource management’ caught my attention, and I’ll report on them in a little more detail.

The ‘Management-Science Knowledge Gap’ symposium began with David Briske (Texas A&M) noting that both experiential and scientific information were necessary for the knowledge to achieve sustainable rangelands, but that knowledge exchange between these sources is limited, and each knowledge source is often disparaging of the other. Presentations on agency and scientific perspectives were followed by Justin Derner (USDA-ARS) outlining what he has learnt from a successful career in management-relevant science.   He highlighted the need to explicitly include the human dimension and economics in projects, and to greatly increase communication and on-ground interactions between managers and scientists.   Jim Dobrowolski (USDA-NIFA) reported a review of some 10,000 USDA projects which revealed that only 280 (less than 0.03%) had any real stakeholder involvement! In an effort to link science with management and increase the management and practice focus of USDA-funded research, NIFA proposals must now be stakeholder driven, problem focussed and outcome oriented, with integrated research, education and extension activities to achieve ‘stakeholder co-production of knowledge’.

In the ‘Useable Science’ symposium Lori Hidinger (Arizona State) set the scene by acknowledging that in the US non-defence research funds have been stable for the past 10-12 years and that 80% of those funds are invested in bio-medical research.   Lori posed the question of “how do we use science to make real progress towards societal goals”, and noted several myths about ‘science’:

  • Useable science = applied science
  • Benefits of science are unpredictable
  • More research is always better, and
  • Decision makers benefit at the end of the research process.

Mark Brunson (Utah State) summarized the socio-economic aspects of the top rangeland sustainability issues as:

  1. “Understanding and managing for variability, adaptation and recovery
  2. Improving desirability and profitability for new generations to make a living from rangelands
  3. Getting the right knowledge and information to the knowledge beneficiaries, and
  4. Understanding and creating incentives for stewardship across boundaries, recognizing that benefits can accrue widely”.

Human capacity in the rangelands is a huge global issue, and Mark challenged the audience to understand the barriers and opportunities for new people to enter and persist in rangeland occupations.

Reflecting on the sessions I was able to attend, there was a strong message about greater collaboration among stakeholders for effective action, and the need for: i) greater understanding of knowledge users and the outcomes they seek, ii) more diverse viewpoints and knowledge to solve complex issues, iii) a redesign of the process of science, with greater emphasis on the co-production of knowledge, and iv) more ‘boundary spanners’ - that is, people who can span the institutional, jurisdictional, disciplinary, political, values and knowledge boundaries to define and address the larger and more complex problems we face.

Finally, I had the pleasure of accepting an ‘Outstanding Achievement – Stewardship’ Award on behalf of Dr Vic Squires (Adelaide, SA). Vic was one of the founding members of the ARS, and his citation is provided elsewhere in this newsletter – Congratulations on this honour Vic!   Another award recipient, well known to many in Australia, was Kris Havstad (NRCS, Las Cruces NM) - he received the Chapline Research Award.

The 69th SRM meeting will be held in Corpus Christie (TX) from 31st January to 6th February 2016. Further information will appear in due course at http://www.rangelands.org/ . 

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SRM PRESS RELEASE - SQUIRES RECEIVES OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FOR STEWARDSHIP

Dr. Victor R. Squires of Adelaide, Australia received the Outstanding Achievement Award for Stewardship at the Society for Range Management’s 68th Annual Meeting held in Sacramento, California earlier this month. The Outstanding Achievement Award is presented by the Society for Range Management for outstanding achievement to members and other qualified individuals and groups working with rangelands.

Dr. Squires has had a long and productive career including principal research scientist for CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) and Dean of Roseworthy Agricultural College at the University of Adelaide. Following retirement from the University, Vic has worked as a rangeland consultant in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. He has worked in over 20 countries, spending much of his time since retirement in China.

In total, Dr. Squires has published approximately 169 papers, 17 books, and 7 symposia proceedings. He was a founding member of the Australian Rangeland Society and served as President, and was Chair of the 2nd International Rangeland Congress which was held in Adelaide in 1984.

Vic Squires is an internationally recognized rangeland scientist. He has made significant contributions through research and consulting to enhance our understanding of the world’s rangelands. His work has covered many subjects and he has been continually productive for over 50 years! For his dedication to rangeland, it was with great honor that the Society for Range Management presented Dr. Victor Squires with a 2015 Outstanding Achievement Award for Stewardship.

720

Dr Vic Squires pictured here with the ARS Finance and Audit Officer Peter Marin

 

 

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RANGELAND RELATED CONFERENCES 2015-16

18th Biennial Conference of the Australian Rangeland Society – Alice Springs, NT - 12-16 April, 2015
Theme: Innovation in the rangelands.
Further information: http://arsconference.com.au/

50th Annual Congress of the Grassland Society of Southern Africa – Pietermaritzburg, SOUTH AFRICA – 19-23 July 2015
Theme: Advancing plant ecology and pasture management in Africa.
Further information: http://grassland.org.za/

23rd International Grassland Congress – New Delhi, INDIA – 20-24 November 2015
Theme: Sustainable use of grassland resources for production, biodiversity and environmental protection
Further information: http://igc2015.org/

69th Annual Meeting of the Society for Range Management – Corpus Christi, TX, USA – 29 January-6th February 2016
Theme: To be announced
Further information: http://www.rangelands.org/

10th International Rangeland Congress – Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CANADA – 17-22 July 2016
Theme: The future management of grazing and wild lands in a high-tech world.
Further information: http://irc2016canada.ca

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NEW MEMBERS

 

Aaron Organ - Ascot Vale, Vic
Frances Frahn - Carrieton, SA
Diane Pearson - Darwin, NT
Scott Werner - Leederville, WA
Kiri Broad - Longreach, Qld
Catherine Crowden - Charleville, Qld
Michael Digby - Yorkeys Knob, Qld
Aaron Fenner - Roxby Downs, SA
Claire Hobbs - Mount Isa, Qld
Jimmy Cocking - Alice Springs, NT
Chukwudozie Okoye - Braddon, ACT
Ian Houston - Longreach, Qld
Megan Willis - Charters Towers, Qld
Mick Brady - Mount Isa, Qld

 

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2015 ARS MEMBERSHIP RATES

2015 Membership Rates; GST inclusive, $15 will be deducted if paid before 1st April

                                                                                         Australia           Overseas Airmail

Individual or Family

  • Full (Journal + Newsletter)/Student                $115/$95              $140/$115
  • Part (Newsletter only)/Student                           $75/$60                $85/$65

Company

  • Full (Journal + Newsletter)                                   $150                      $180
  • Part (Newsletter only)                                             $90                        $105

* Please note that the RMN will only be available electronically to members except those who pay an additional $15 membership subscription to receive a printed copy of each issue - see note below under the heading Membership Subscription Rates for 2015

New members are encouraged to join the Society via the ARS website (www.austrangesoc.com.au) and renewing members should also pay their 2015 dues through the website, if possible.  A renewing member should logon using their Username, which is their email address as in the ARS database, and their Password, which is “new login xxxx”, xxxx being the member’s membership number.  If you do not know your membership number, please contact Graeme Tupper by email, xgraemetupperx@gmail.com. Some members may have changed their Password in the database, in which case, Graeme Tupper will not know it. If you encounter problems in logging on, contact Graeme Tupper.

  • All rates are quoted in AUSTRALIAN currency and must be paid in AUSTRALIAN currency.
  • Membership is for the calendar year 1st January to 31st December. New member subscriptions paid after 1st October are deemed as payment for the following year.

Any member who has not paid his/her subscription by 31st March of the financial year for which it is payable shall be deemed unfinancial, and all his/her rights and privileges as a member of the Society are suspended until the subscription is paid.

Membership Subscription Rates for 2015

The 2015 Subscription Rates remain as for 2014.  For members who wish to receive a printed copy of the RMN, an additional $15 membership subscription will be required, except for members who do not have an email address, who will continue to receive a printed copy as part of their standard membership fee.Any enquiries relating to this should be directed to Graeme Tupper, Subscription Manager, xgraemetupperx@gmail.com

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GUIDELINES FOR THE AUSTRALIAN RANGELAND AWARDS

ARS AWARDS - NEW GUIDELINES

The Society has two awards to assist members with either:

  • travel expenses associated with attending a conference or some other activity, or
  • studies related to the rangelands.

The Guidelines for these awards have been recently revised and are set out below.  Members interested in either award should submit a written outline of their proposed activity.  Applications should clearly address how the intended activity (ie. travel or study) meets the aims of the Society.  Applications should be brief (less than 1000 words) and should be submitted to the Secretary, Carolyn Ireland, before 30 November.  An application form can be downloaded from the ARS website at www.austrangesoc.com.au.  For further information contact Carolyn by phone on (08) 8370 9207 or email at cireland@irmpl.com.au.


The Australian Rangeland Society Members’ Travel Grant

Name

  • It shall be known as the Australian Rangeland Society Members’ Travel Grant.

Purpose

  • The Grant is intended to assist an eligible person or persons to attend a meeting, conference, or congress which deals with the art or science of managing rangelands; or to assist an eligible person or persons with travel or transport costs to investigate a topic connected with range management or to implement a program of rangeland investigation not already being undertaken. The Grant is available for overseas travel, and or travel within Australia. It is not intended for subsistence expenses.

Determination

  • The Grant will be awarded, or not awarded, by Council on the merits of a written application (not exceeding 1000 words) clearly setting out the relevance of the applicant’s proposal in meeting the aims of the Society. Failure to comply with these guidelines may mean rejection of an application.

Conditions

  • Applications may be submitted at any time but will only be considered by Council at the first scheduled regular Council Meeting after the closing date for applications of 30 November each calendar year, to be granted in the following calendar year. Applications must be submitted on the form entitled “Application Form for Travel Grant or Scholarship”.
  • One or more Travel Grants can be awarded in a calendar year. The maximum amount available for distribution in a calendar year is up to $6000 based on relevance, innovation and merit.
  • Applications should include details of costs and set out precisely how the Grant is to be expended. Details of any other sources of funding must be given.
  • Successful applicants are required to submit an article reporting on their activities, suitable for publication in the Society’s Newsletter or Journal, as appropriate, within six months of completion of travel.
  • Applications should include the names of at least two referees.

Eligibility

  • No formal qualifications are required. There are no age restrictions and all members of the Society are eligible to apply. Applications are particularly encouraged from persons who have little or no organisational support.
  • Only members of the Society with more than twelve months membership will be eligible to apply for the Travel Grant. Travel can be either within Australia or overseas. Overseas travel can include travel to Australia by overseas members.

Acquittal

  • Any Grant awarded must be properly accounted for by the recipient who will provide to Council full details of expenses incurred within four weeks of completion of travel. Unexpended funds must be refunded to the Society.
  • The recipient will submit their written report to Council within six months of completion of travel.

Miscellaneous

  • Interpretation of these guidelines is at the discretion of the governing Council in office at the time.
  • These guidelines may be altered by a majority vote at a special general meeting or an Annual General Meeting after notice has been duly served.

 

 

The Australian Rangeland Society Members’ Scholarship

Name

  • It shall be known as the Australian Rangeland Society Members’ Scholarship.

Purpose

  • The Scholarship is an annual award intended to assist an eligible person or persons to undertake formal study of a subject or course which will enable the recipient to pursue the art or science of rangelands management and further the aims of the Australian Rangeland Society. The Scholarship is available for study assistance either overseas or within Australia. It is not intended to defray travel expenses.

Determination

  • The Scholarship will be awarded, or not awarded, by Council on the merits of a written application (not exceeding 1000 words) clearly setting out the relevance of the applicant’s proposed course of study to rangelands management and in meeting the aims of the Society. Failure to comply with these guidelines may mean rejection of an application.

Conditions

  • Applications may be submitted at any time but will only be considered by Council at the first scheduled regular Council Meeting after the closing date for applications of 30 November each calendar year, to be granted in the following calendar year. Applications must be submitted on the form entitled “Application Form for Travel Grant or Scholarship”.
  • One or more Scholarships can be awarded in a calendar year. The maximum amount available for distribution in a calendar year is up to $6000 based on relevance, innovation and merit.
  • Applications should include details of the program of study or course to be undertaken and the institution under whose auspices it will be carried out. It should state precisely how the Scholarship is to be expended. Details of any other sources of funding must be given.
  • Applications should include the names of at least two referees.
  • Upon the conclusion of a course of study a recipient of a Scholarship will be required to write an article on their experiences, suitable for publication in the Society’s Newsletter.

Eligibility

  • No formal qualifications are required. There are no age restrictions and all members of the Society are eligible to apply. Applications are particularly encouraged from persons who do not have any organisational support.
  • Only members of the Society with more than twelve months membership will be eligible to apply for the Scholarship. Study can be undertaken either within Australia or overseas. Overseas study can include study in Australia by overseas members.
  • A recipient who has received a Scholarship in any one calendar year, if undertaking a continuous course of study, can apply for a further Scholarship, provided that the person has satisfied council as to the proper acquittal of any previous monies and has demonstrated satisfactory progress. Notwithstanding, such a person will not necessarily be given preference over other applicants.

Acquittal

  • Any Scholarship awarded must be properly accounted for by the recipient who, depending upon the length of the course undertaken, will be required to report to Council on the progress of study at a regular interval as determined by Council. Unexpended funds shall be refundable to the Society.
  • The recipient will submit their final written report to Council within six months of completion of study.

Miscellaneous

  • Interpretation of these guidelines is at the discretion of the governing Council in office at the time.
  • These guidelines may be altered by a majority vote at a special general meeting or an Annual General Meeting after notice has been duly served.

  

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ARS CONTACTS 2015

ARS COUNCIL AND OTHER CONTACTS 2014

PRESIDENT
John Taylor
37 Pioneer Crescent
Bellbowrie QLD 4070
Ph: (07) 3202 7632
Mobile: 0429 725 838
Email: taylamob@tpg.com.au

FINANCE AND AUDIT OFFICER
Peter Marin
MLCS Corporate Pty Ltd
120 The Parade
Norwood SA 5067
PO Box 2691 
Kent Town SA 5071
Ph: (08) 8363 7755
Mobile: 0408 678 451
Email: peter@mlcscorporate.com.au

SECRETARY
Carolyn Ireland
Ireland Resource Management Pty Ltd
13 Woodland Close
Aldgate SA 5154
Ph: (08) 8320 9207
Mobile: 0400 309 207
Email: cireland@irmpl.com.au

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GENERAL MEMBERS

Graeme Tupper
PO Box 141
Orange NSW 2800
Ph: (02) 6361 7734
Email: xgraemetupperx@gmail.com

Annabel Walsh
Moorna Station
NSW 2648
Ph: (03) 5028 2250
Mobile: 0427 282 262
Email: annabelwalshmoorna@gmail.com

Andrew Ash
CSIRO Ecosciences Precinct
GPO Box 2583, Brsibane  QLD 4001
Ph: (07) 3833 5638
Email: Andrew.Ash@csiro.au

Ben Forsyth
Three Rivers Station
Meekathara WA 6642
Ph: (08) 9981 2932
Mobile: 0427 551 114
Email: ben@beefwood.com.au

David Phelps
PO Box 519
Longreach, QLD 4730
Ph: (07) 4650 1244
Mobile: 0427 270 259
Email: David.Phelps@daff.qld.gov.au 
Email: david.gphelps@bigpond.com

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SUBSCRIPTION MANAGER
Graeme Tupper
PO Box 141
Orange NSW 2800
Ph: 02 6361 7734
Email: xgraemetupperx@gmail.com

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE CHAIR
Ron Hacker
Ph: (02) 6882 0416
Mobile: 0419 488 318
Email: ron.hacker@crt.net.au

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF (The Rangeland Journal)
John Milne
The James Hutton Institute
Craigiebuckler
Aberdeen SCOTLAND
Email: johnmilne@aol.com

EDITOR – RMN
Noelene Duckett
5 Amery Street
Ashburton VIC 3147
Ph: (03) 9885 9026
Email: aduckett7@msn.com

EDITOR – ARS WEBSITE
Russell Grant
Western CMA
PO Box 307 Cobar NSW 2835
Ph: (02) 6836 1575

Email: russell.grant@cma.nsw.gov.au  

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